Energy-environment-society interactions

This meeting gathers thought-leaders from across disciplines and sectors to better understand the coincidental ecosystem effects of wind, solar and marine energy infrastructure and the implications for society. Science knowledge gaps will be highlighted, a future research roadmap developed, policy needs identified and disparate researchers and practitioners in the emerging energy-ecosystem field united to promote a more sustainable energy transition.

This meeting is intended for those who work in relevant fields and will take place online. Please note this meeting will take place on 18, 19, 25, and 26 February 2021.

Thursday 18th February – Stetting the scene & state of the science

13.30 – 14.50

Putting environment into the energy transition:  Dr Alona Armstrong, Lancaster University, and Prof Nicky Beaumont, Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Science, policy and the path to net zero: Chris Stark, CEO of the Climate Change Committee

The value of our ecosystems: Prof Kathy Willis, Natural Capital Committee and Oxford University

14.50 – 15.05

Break

Designing future energy policies through quantitative analysis methods: Gemma Delafield, University of Exeter

Ecosystem impacts of floating photovoltaic systems on water bodies: Giles Exley, Lancaster University

Trade-offs between greenhouse gas emissions, climate regulation and ecosystem services: Kathryn Logan, University College Dublin

The ecology and sustainability of solar energy across natural and human-dominated landscapes: Dr Rebecca Hernandez, University of California Davis

 

Friday 19th February – State of the science

13.30 – 15.00

Resolving the ecological consequences of renewable energy through trophic levels: Dr Maria Thaker, Indian Institute of Science

The expansion of offshore wind – Costs and co-benefits for ecosystem services: Dr Stephen Watson, Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Social, psychological and spatial dimensions of the siting of renewable energy infrastructures: Prof Patrick Devine-Wright, University of Exeter

15.00 – 15.15

Break

15.15 – 16.20

Discussion: Critical research needs, barriers & accelerants

What new knowledge is required?

What barriers exist to development of the required knowledge?

What can be done to more rapidly accelerate the development of knowledge?

Friday 19th February – State of the science

13.30 – 15.00

Resolving the ecological consequences of renewable energy through trophic levels: Dr Maria Thaker, Indian Institute of Science

The expansion of offshore wind – Costs and co-benefits for ecosystem services: Dr Stephen Watson, Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Social, psychological and spatial dimensions of the siting of renewable energy infrastructures: Prof Patrick Devine-Wright, University of Exeter

15.00 – 15.15

Break

15.15 – 16.20

Discussion: Critical research needs, barriers & accelerants

What new knowledge is required?

What barriers exist to development of the required knowledge?

What can be done to more rapidly accelerate the development of knowledge?

Thursday 25th February – The policy & practice context

13.30 – 14.45

The future of the UK energy mix: Patrick Allcorn, BEIS

Land use change for renewable energy: Defra, TBC

14.45 – 15.00

Break

15.00 – 16.20

Integration of environmental, social and energy needs at the regional scale: James Johnson, Local Energy Northwest Hub

Creating a business case for corporate decision-making for the inclusion of ecosystem considerations in energy decarbonisation: Jessica Fox, Electric Power Research Institute

Friday 26th February – The policy & practice context

13.30 – 15.00

Multi-purpose land management for renewable energy, ecosystem services and food: Dr Jonathan Scurlock, National Farmers Union

Managing marine environments for revenue, energy and natural capital:  Adrian Fox, The Crown Estate

Developing a natural capital ethos within the solar energy sector: Nicholas Gall, Canadian Renewable Energy Association

15.00 – 15.15

Break

15.15 – 16.20

Discussion: Evolving policy and practice

Where is policy and practice failing and where is it succeeding?

How could policy and practice be changed to integrate environment?

What approaches can be used to better integrate across sectors (e.g. developers, policy-makers, researchers) and disciplines (e.g. social scientists, ecologists)?

Organised by Dr Alona Armstrong, Lancaster University, and Professor Nicola Beaumont, Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

For more information click here.

 

18 February 2021 - 26 February 2021